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Writing a Good Resume: Student Critique and Practice Exercise

What should go on a college resume?

❶It personalizes the writer and provides additional information about him or her and any relevant experience in a standard form.

High School Student Resume Sample

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As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her! This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else.

When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time. Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes.

Who got the highest score? It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students.

At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing. This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip.

You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon. Blow up the balloons. Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside.

Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? This is a good activity for determining your students' note-taking abilities. Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself.

They'll learn about some of your background, hobbies, and interests from the second oral "biography" that you will present. Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share. When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib.

This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true. Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib. Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself. Then provide each student a chance to present the second oral biography and to test the others' note-taking abilities by presenting his or her own "fact or fib quiz.

Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Here's a variation on the previous activity: Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom. There will be quite a bit of space between students.

The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group. Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies. After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity.

When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class. The other students refer to their notes or try to recall which fact is really a fib. Contributor Unknown People Poems Have each child use the letters in his or her name to create an acrostic poem.

Tell students they must include words that tell something about themselves -- for example, something they like to do or a personality or physical trait. Invite students to share their poems with the class. This activity is a fun one that enables you to learn how your students view themselves. Allow older students to use a dictionary or thesaurus. You might also vary the number of words for each letter, according to the students' grade levels.

Bill Laubenberg Another Poetic Introduction. Ask students to use the form below to create poems that describe them. This activity lends itself to being done at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the year. You and your students will have fun comparing their responses and seeing how the students and the responses have changed. Contributor Unknown Food for Thought To get to know students and to help them get to know one another, have each student state his or her name and a favorite food that begins with the same first letter as the name.

Watch out -- it gets tricky for the last person who has to recite all the names and foods! Here's a challenging activity that might help high school teachers learn about students' abilities to think critically. Send students into the school hallways or schoolyard, and ask each to find something that "is completely the opposite of yourself. To widen the area to be explored, provide this activity as homework on the first night of school. When students bring their items back to class, ask each to describe why the item is not like him or her.

You'll get a lot of flowers, of course, and students will describe how those flowers are fragrant or soft or otherwise unlike themselves.

But you might also get some clever responses, such as the one from a young man who brought in the flip-top from a discarded can; he talked about its decaying outward appearance and its inability to serve a purpose without being manipulated by some other force and how he was able to serve a purpose on his own.

Joy Ross Personal Boxes In this activity, each student selects a container of a reasonable size that represents some aspect of his or her personality or personal interests, such as a football helmet or a saucepan. Ask students to fill that object with other items that represent themselves -- for example, family photos, CDs, dirty socks, a ballet shoe -- and bring their containers back to school. Students can use the objects in the containers as props for three-minute presentations about themselves.

The teacher who provided this idea suggests that you model the activity and encourage creativity by going first -- it's important for students to see you as human too!

She included in her container a wooden spoon because she loves to cook, a jar of dirt because she loves to garden, her son's first cowboy boot, a poem she wrote, a rock from Italy because she loves to travel, and so on. You'll learn much about each student with this activity, and it will create a bond among students. As each student gives a presentation, you might write a brief thank-you note that mentions something specific about the presentation so that each student can take home a special note to share with parents.

It might take a few days to give every student the opportunity to share. Getting to Know One Another Volume 2: Who's in the Classroom?

My Classmates and Me Volume 4: Activities for the First Day of School Volume Back-to-School Activities Volume 5: Be sure to see our tips for using Every-Day Edits in your classroom. See our idea file. Run out of Every-Day Edit activities for the month of September? Check out our Xtra activities for any time of year. This course is designed for all K educators looking for a fun and engaging way to help students take control of their own learning by using gamification.

It can be used for all subject areas at any level. This course is designed to teach you how to better engage learners by using gamification in their lessons. You'll discover how intrinsic and extrinsic motivations work, and how gamification can foster a growth mindset towards learning.

Ultimately, you will learn how to use gamification as fun, non-threatening built-in assessment for any class content where students get to use choice and voice in their learning. Now, you can apply this 2-step process in reverse. This means, look for a job the interests you first then figure out if you have the skill set required for the position.

Take note of keywords used by the employer in the job post as you will need this in your resume. What are the usual skills that employers are looking for in an applicant who is still a high school student? After going through each item in this list, ask yourself if there were instances in your life where you were required to harness these particular skills.

For example, were you ever charged to manage a school fund raising project? What were the results? How much funds did you raise? Share these experiences with the Hiring Manager reading your resume. Everybody loves a good story — even hiring managers. Use your High School resume objective to share your story and tell prospective employers why they should hire you. In our sample resume objective for High School Student, the candidate Tyler told his story in only five sentences.

He structured the sentences to tell his story in the following order: A well-written resume objective; like the one we crafted for Tyler, will surely get the interest of the person reviewing your resume. When you have very little or no experience whatsoever, use the combination as your High School Student resume format.

With the combination format, you can be more flexible in how you present your qualifications. In our resume template for High School Student, we arranged the key sections in this order: Tyler allocates more time in school to maintain his grade point average and to attend to his extra-curricular activities.

If you are submitting an entry level High School Student resume, simply remove the section on work experience then focus on writing a stronger resume objective. Tell the prospective employer why you need the job or why the company should take a chance on someone without work experience.

However, be careful not to leave any unexplained gaps in your work history. Give specifics about what your responsibilities or accomplishments were at each job. Bullet points are an easy way to do this. Use two or three bullets to describe the skills you used, or how you improved the business. For example, if you were to put your restaurant work history on a resume for a banking job, it might look like this:. These are all skills you might use at a banking job, even though your experience was at a restaurant.

Remember to be detailed and specific in your Work History section. Employers want to know exactly what you did or learned so they know what you have to offer as an employee.

For students who are new to the job market, interests and activities are a good way to show employers you have skills they are looking for. If you were on a sports team, or were active in the chess club, those can show you are a team player. If you took dance lessons for 10 years, that shows you are passionate and committed.

These activities show commitment, responsibility, and leadership. Information like this can help employers realize that you could be the best candidate for the job. For this section, you can go back to the notes you took about your skills in steps 1 and 2. Fill out this section using the skills that relate to the job you want. They show you have something to offer that other job seekers might not.

As with every section on your resume, always add relevant details. Maybe you were in the Honor Society, or were Employee of the Month. Awards, honors, and achievements from your academics, activities, or jobs are worth listing on a resume. If you feel it would benefit your resume, you can list the contact information of up to three references. Keep in mind that no matter what it says on your resume, employers may ask you for references.

You should always have at least three references available. Avoid using friends or family members as professional references. Ask former employers, professors, teachers, or coaches instead.

This is the final step in creating a great resume that will get you a great job. Show employers you are detail-oriented and organized by proofreading your resume. Before sending your resume out, double check it for spelling and grammar errors. If you can, have a friend look over it to catch anything you might have missed. Each template comes with sample content that you will change to your own information. You should modify each example by rearranging, adding, or deleting sections to highlight your unique experience and skills.

They can still give you ideas on what to include and how to format your resume. Resume for position of accounting assistant. Can also be modified for general office position secretary, back office, customer service. Another sample for different types of office jobs: Resume for someone with strong technical skills in IT, or for someone looking for career in IT sector.

Resume for an application for an entry-level position at freight forwarding agency.

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Here's what you should include on your high school resume and tips for how to write a resume for high school students. Here's what you should include on your high school resume and tips for how to write a resume for high school students. High School Resume Examples and Writing Tips. Share Flip Pin Share Email.

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Sample Resume for High School Students () Awards Laser print it or have it done at the copy center. Jane Doe 12 Snelling Avenue St. Paul, Minnesota

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Resume example for a high school student including education, achievements, activities, and skills, plus more resume examples and writing tips. A Self-Help Quiz for High School Students Tip for Career Counselors: You can transform this list of self-help questions into a group exercise for five or six students.

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High school students are taught how to use resumes and cover letters to highlight their skills and make them stand out, whether applying to college or for a job. Resumes and Cover Letters for High School Students - ReadWriteThink. No experience? No problem! Use our resume template for high school students and expert writing guide to turn your education, extracurriculars, and volunteer work into a full page resume. Download our FREE high school student resume example to customize your's in no time!